No Time To Play

Tag: retrogaming

Weekly Links #159: tooling edition

by on Feb.26, 2017, under Gamedev, News

Oh, wow. The gaming world must have been really active this week, because I picked up a ton of links without even trying. Gonna keep commentary short, OK?

Let’s start with a number of retrospectives: a brief one of Street Fighter II (the arcade version; to me it was always a Super Famicom title), a longer one of the recently rediscovered Habitat, the world’s very first graphical MMO, that a team is now trying to revive; and an interview with John Romero about a long-lived tile editor.

Still on the topic of tools (it’s a recurring theme this week), Emily Short posts some general advice on making your own, which applies to a lot more than interactive fiction. Especially relevant considering the vast number of tools these days made for easy, visual creation of HTML5 games. Fans of retrogaming might be more interested in how to set up Arcade Game Designer on the ZX Spectrum, while for RPG developers there’s Uncharted Atlas, an unusually realistic generator of fantasy maps.

In more general game design news, we have an article about blending procedural generation with handcrafted content, and another about basing a game in real-world history. And for an announcement I can’t possibly pass on, Seltani is now on itch.io.

I’ll end with a bit of a rant. My friend and regular reader fluffy has returned to game development after a long absence, with a jam entry called Colorful Critter. And unfortunately I was completely unable to play the game on Linux. See, fluffy went with Love2D for this project, which is a very tempting choice (I considered it). Trouble is, Love2D games are nowhere near as portable and easy to distribute as its creators would have you believe. Let’s take it step by step:

  • Most Linux distributions carry an ancient version if at all.
  • Official binaries are only available for Ubuntu.
  • The Windows build doesn’t work under Wine.
  • Building from source is way too much trouble just to play a few games.

It should be noted that most of these issues are due to the use of SDL2, a notoriously finicky library with multiple components and dependencies that make it hard to build and ship with a game, an issue made worse by its creators’ insistence that people stick with dynamic linking. (Pro tip: no programmer is going to pluck a DLL straight out of another app and use it as such; they’ll look for the official website.) And yet it’s somehow become a de facto standard for 2D and even 3D game development. Go figure.

But I’m already way over my quota for the week. See you next time.

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Weekly Links #157

by on Feb.12, 2017, under Miscellaneous, News

Hello, everyone. With the launch of my latest project things have calmed down a bit, and as it happens we have a week with plenty of links as well.

Let’s start with some cool tools you can find on itch.io as of no more than a few days ago. For one thing, my own Stereo Imagination: a tool for generating 3D models with many repetitive elements by writing tiny scripts (15-20 lines can go a long way) in a clean, friendly language. Then we have a couple of legendary products, namely Adventure Game Studio and BlitzMax, that can also be acquired from the same place now.

But game developers also need to know their history. Via Konstantinos Dimopoulos comes the news of a Ms. Pac-Man retrospective occasioned by the game’s 35th anniversary, and an in-depth [review of Richard Gariott’s autobiography], that we also covered last time. What can I say, a living legend is going to generate interest.

Last but not least, while we’re on the subject of gaming history, Raphaël Lucas reminds people that the Internet Archive hosts, among other treasures, an extensive gamebook collection, that can be browsed online or downloaded in a variety of formats.

And that’s it for this week, largely because there’s not much to comment on any of this cool stuff. Enjoy!

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Weekly Links #155

by on Jan.29, 2017, under Gamedev, News

Hello, everyone! Looks like another brief newsletter, not least due to my social media feeds being swamped by political turmoil these days. But we all do what we can. Let’s start with a couple of classic game retrospectives, namely Deus Ex and Alpha Centauri. In somewhat related news, a fan demake of Civilization 2 for the Commodore 64.

By way of game design articles, here’s the third article in the series about color in games I mentioned two weeks ago. (Turns out I missed the second one.) Which reminds me that the overuse of orange-blue palettes in games has been soundly criticized in recent years. The trick? It’s not the limited palette — those are a powerful tool in the arsenal of an artist — but how you make use of that palette. And nowadays game art is necessarily rushed, what with games of exploding complexity expected to be made in the same amount of time as their modest predecessors from last century. A recipe for trouble if there ever was one.

I’ll end with some musings on game pricing from someone who plays in a whole different league from me, so I can’t comment. Hopefully you’ll find it useful.

Until next time, don’t lose your humanity. Cheers.

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Weekly Links #152

by on Jan.08, 2017, under News, Opinion

Hello, everyone! We’re having a slow week again, and most of it dedicated to interactive fiction as usual (sorry). For one thing, PC Gamer puts the recent IFComp in the spotlight, thus further cementing the genre’s return to the mainstream. And via K.D. we learn that Douglas Adams was working on a modern Hitchhiker’s Guide game right before his untimely death in 2001. It’s a bit of non-news, really, as the assets being lost means there’s no chance of reviving the project after all these years. Doubly so as those assets were likely made for VGA displays back in the day, which would make them unusable in the 4K era.

And that, of course, highlights yet again the folly of obsoleting perfectly good technology at the drop of a hat. Imagine if vinyl had been completely abandoned within the year from CDs hitting the market. No more support for turntables, nothing. Entire collections of old, rare music becoming completely useless unless people worked hard to maintain failing hardware until there were just no more dead units left to scavenge for parts. That’s what we’re doing with computer games, and before you ask why we should bother preserving some piece of shovelware, the answer is that you can only know a classic in retrospect. If you didn’t take care of it on time, sixteen years down the road — when you finally realize it wasn’t just another piece of shovelware after all — you can only weep for the loss. And that’s terrible.

Last but not least, my friend Kris is at it again with a batch of capsule reviews for tabletop RPGs and board games. Enjoy, and see you next time.

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Weekly Links #151: new beginnings edition

by on Jan.01, 2017, under Gamedev, News

Happy New Year 2017! Things picked up noticeably the week after Christmas, so we can begin anew with aplomb. For one, a very good friend bought me a Pico-8 license, and of course I couldn’t resist playing with it. It’s an incredibly polished experience for such a restricted platform, one that immediately inspired me to start remaking one of my early games. I’m not sure quite what makes it feel so good, but it’s one of those systems that feel designed, not just thrown together, and that’s rare today.

Given that, it’s especially appropriate that Rock, Paper, Shotgun just published a series of articles about working with the Pico-8. I do have one quibble: ideas, my friend, are a dime a dozen. If you have to go around hunting for ideas, maybe you don’t have anything to say right now. Go out and live some more.

On a similar note, Kotaku is running the story of a game journalist turned developer. And it sounds not so much like someone who learned just how hard it is to actually make those games they used to criticize, as someone who grew up and learned to assume good faith. A win, either way. Can’t even blame them: I used to have my troll-ish moments as a delayed teenager. Haven’t we all? So it’s all good.

To end with a couple of actual releases, here’s Roguelike One, a quick, simple game that could be played with a NES controller (in the sense that it only uses arrow keys and two action buttons). No prize for guessing what it’s a fan game of. 😛 And in the retro department, Prime Mover is a Construct 2 title carefully made to resemble a ZX Spectrum game, down to the way controls are responding. Which, of course, is a lot more work than making it for the Speccy like my own two attempts. Nice!

On that note, I wish you the best until next time. Thanks for reading.

 

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Weekly Links #144: looking backwards edition

by on Oct.30, 2016, under News

Welcome, readers, to another full week. For one thing, I had lengthy commentary to make on a couple of articles, that were banished to the other blog as a consequence (here and here), so as not to take up excessive space. In other news, there are still two weeks to go in the IFComp, and I’m working on yet another harebrained scheme, that seems to be working out for a change. Stay tuned!

Anyway, after a brief absence, Jimmy Maher is back with an article about how Jordan Mechner did cinematic games in the 1980s better than any modern studio with all their 21st century tech. On a similar note, Ars Technica offers a retrospective of the PLATO network, that birthed many of the concepts we take for granted in modern gaming. And over on Play the Past, there’s a write-up comparing modern RPGs to… the Iliad and Odyssey. A fresh and surprising angle, to say the least. Once again, hooray for the increasing academic involvement in videogames.

Conversely, Hardcore Gaming 101 grouchily discusses the much more recent game Her Story. (I smell burnout. Not to criticize them; happens to everyone.) And to finish on a happy note, take a look at these photos of vintage computer stores. Those were the days!

Thank you for putting up with yet another post focused on the past, and keep your spirits up in the coming week. Pun not intended.

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Weekly Links #142

by on Oct.16, 2016, under Gamedev, News

Hello, everyone. There was no Laser Sky update this week because, frankly, there’s not much to say. I did manage to add the high score table, then the promised menu system, including an option screen. Forgot to add one to limit continues, but those should remain infinite until the game is done, anyway. The bad news is, now I have no excuse: it’s time to add the remaining levels. And that will require potentially tricky code changes, in addition to yet more of that exhausting balancing work. At least now I have some experience…

Otherwise, lots of retrogaming news this week. From Gamasutra, we have the birth of Japanese RPGs — a story that’s usually both whitewashed and oversimplified, it turns out. And via Vintage Is the New Old we learn of a website called Games That Weren’t, dedicated to saving canceled or lost games from the dustbin of history. Last but not least, here’s a review of a quasi-roguelike born on the (in)famous Tandy TRS-80 in 1980 and carried into the Windows era by a fan. A terrible game, but a fascinating delve into history — not to mention a challenge. How can you make that format actually work?

Also in the way of game design, the people who made Dungeons of Dredmor are at it again, with a write-up on challenge in videogames, which touches on configurable difficulty among other things. Thought-provoking indeed. In unrelated news, Emily Short points at a blog post about teaching history with interactive fiction. Not much that’s new to me, but the links therein promptly sent me down a deep, branching rabbit hole. (How appropriate!) It’s remarkable what academics can come up with when they set out to study videogames. Too bad their work isn’t more widely known, even when it’s accessible to laypeople.

Until next time, consider what the past can teach us.

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Weekly Links #135

by on Aug.28, 2016, under Miscellaneous, News

Hello, everyone. You might like to know that my new book Make Your Own Programming Language is now also on itch.io. This version isn’t as pretty, but it’s more printable, with fewer pages and no syntax highlighting. The content is otherwise identical, and you get the same file formats.

In actual news, Emily Short’s RPS column for this week is a presentation of Texture, the hot new authoring system for interactive fiction. And you know… it bothers me to no end that people sing the praise of Texture’s input system after bashing two-word parsers for decades. Because that’s what Texture did: it reinvented the two-word parser. Which of course is perfectly fine, but can we please acknowledge and address the issue?

On a rather different note, via Vintage Is the New Old here’s a story about someone remastering a ZX Spectrum game after a quarter century — a very instructive, if overly technical, look at history. More approachable is an article about the masters of Commodore 64 games, but the moral is the same: we’re truly blessed nowadays. Why did the hardware makers from decades ago have to make their systems so damn quirky? In retrospect, the quirkiness appears to go way beyond what was needed to squeeze more features out of that limited hardware…

I’ll end with Hardware Gaming 101’s brief overview of Thomas Was Alone, the strange indie platformer from a few years ago that proved there was a huge market for games not driven by technology, and opened the way for more recent successes in the same vein — a most welcome trend if you ask me.

Until next time, consider the lessons of the past.

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Weekly Links #132

by on Aug.07, 2016, under News, Opinion

Hello, everyone. This week, Vintage Is the New Old notes that the Internet Archive just uploaded 13 years’ worth of Nintendo Power issues. Which reminded me of the times in 8th grade when all the boys would gather around a classmate whose parents were wealthy enough to get him issues of a similar magazine from France, along with Famicom games. It would be years before I got my own console, a Chinese clone, and by then everyone else had moved on to the SNES. But magazines still made people gather around in the classroom…

In unrelated news, we have a couple of rants, like this one about big game companies jumping into virtual reality feet first and messing things up, thus giving the medium a bad reputation. An interesting argument, but I predict that’s not what will kill VR again — rather it will be the realization that VR is still a gimmick with nothing new to say. And from a different source, here’s an opinion piece about what actually matters in procedurally-generated games. Gee, you mean some people play games for the (gasp) mechanics? As in, the one thing that’s unique to the medium? What a surprise… not.

I’ll end with an article on testing interactive fiction with automated gameplay, which contains some ideas easily applicable to other genres, like board games. It’s a kind of fuzzing, really, with comparable benefits and limitations. Also, the bit about repeating game states made me think about certain rules from the games of Chess and Go — it’s not just an issue for computers.

But you already know to take inspiration from the analog world, don’t you?

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Weekly Links #131

by on Jul.31, 2016, under Miscellaneous, News

Is it a book? Is it a piece of software? It is a game? The second edition of Make Your Own Programming Language, that I finished writing today, has a little of all three. Most importantly, it tries to recapture the fun of making the computer follow your instructions, that forgotten quality of programming that used to lure so many people decades ago. It will soon be out to beta-readers, and then I’ll let you know.

In other news, Rock, Paper, Shotgun is running a series of articles on the future of procedural generation, specifically about spinning lore for computer role-playing games. Which would be pretty interesting, except for most roguelikes that would be overkill, while in more conventional CRPGs handcrafted characters, stories and settings are the whole point. Do games that aim to have emerging narratives even need that much detail, especially if it’s ultimately fluff?

Going forward, via Jay Barnson, here’s a Gamasutra article about Chrono Trigger’s Design Secrets, that manages to be useful even though I never played the game. And Jimmy Maher’s history of computer story games has reached the demise of Infocom; check out the quote from Marc Blank, who was stating who knows how long ago what myself and others have been blogging about all spring:

If all of a sudden you can ask any question, but there are really only three questions that are important to the story, you’re either going to spend all this time coming up with answers that don’t mean anything or you’re going to have a lot of “I don’t know that,” which is frustrating. I always suspected it was a dead end. The nice thing about the command-oriented game is that you can come up with a pretty complete vocabulary and a pretty complete set of responses. As soon as it becomes more open-ended — if I can say, “I’m hungry” or “I like blue rubber balls” — how do you respond to that?

To end on a nostalgic note, here’s a blog post about abandoned arcades, and the slow death game cabinets are sentenced to when left exposed to the elements. Thankfully, there is interest in rescuing these old machines as of late, so for the most part arcades are a bit of history we can expect to survive.

Until next time, don’t let the past be forgotten.

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