No Time To Play

Tag: game design

Weekly Links #156

by on Feb.05, 2017, under News, Opinion

Hello, everyone! While still working insanely fast on a project only tangentially related to games (and getting overly tired in the process), this week I somehow managed to gather a nice collection of links on the side.

In the way of legendary game designers, there are good news and bad news. The bad news is, Pac-Man’s creator just died. No comment, except that he’ll be remembered. On the other hand, Richard Gariott isn’t only alive and well, but he was just interviewed by Polygon over his new autobiography. And I dunno about the book, but the write-up makes for pretty good reading.

For the game designers among us, Jay Barnson has a few thoughts on character generation in RPGs. And, well, show me someone who made the acquaintance of D&D and didn’t immediately try to roll a character or ten, even before they had any way to actually play them. Sure, organic development has its place — I went with that approach in my own roguelikes — but the fix for unfamiliar options isn’t removing them, or for that matter forcing the player to read a huge-ass manual upfront. Rather, make sure that:

  1. The process itself is fun and lets players express themselves, and
  2. no single choice is wrong once the game starts.

As for we writers, of games or anything else, Alexis Kennedy just published an excellent article about worldbuilding. And it’s a lesson I had to learn myself the hard way, after my first few attempts at imaginary universes fell flat. In his words:

This does not mean that invented worlds don’t need to feel consistent. Let me say that again, without the double negative, because it’s important: invented worlds should feel consistent! But an invented world can be consistent and detailed and very very dull.

Which is exactly what happens when you build your world first, i.e. before the story. Which is very much putting the cart before the horses. Because you see, what he doesn’t say is that for an audience to care they need something to empathize with. And people don’t empathize with rocks. Give me some characters first; make me care about them, and then I’ll care about their world by extension, even if their world is a tepid medieval village.

But I could write a lot more about that. Let’s finish by pointing out the recent release of Twine 2.1. Which is a bigger upgrade than it sounds, so be sure to check the forums for issues ahead of time.

Have a very nice week.

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Weekly Links #154

by on Jan.22, 2017, under News

Hello, everyone! Once again, I’ve been busy coding stuff that’s not related to games, so there won’t be many links today. Let’s start with the fact that as of last Sunday No Time To Play is on Game Jolt as well. Don’t expect much activity from that direction, but it’s one more way to connect with us if you’re so inclined.

In other news, my friends have been at it again, Kris with some thoughts about setting in videogames, and Sera with an article about who media representation is for. Needless to say, I recommend both, for different reasons.

Then there’s this article I’ve been pointed at, about the educational value of practicing game design, even if your game never ends up being published, or even played by many. Couldn’t agree more, even though I noticed that more often with programming language design, rather than games. Either way, nothing can beat hands-on experience when it comes to learning. All the theory in the world is useless until you see for yourself where it came from.

But that’s enough preachiness for a week. Until next time, roll up your sleeves and make something.

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Weekly Links #153

by on Jan.15, 2017, under News

You know, for a game development blog I don’t post about game design nearly often enough. This week is an exception. Let’s start with Gamasutra’s case study of good first levels — an important part of any game, if by no means the hardest. (Ultimately, the first level is also the easiest to make.) More specifically, we have an article about prefabricated sections in procedurally generated levels and another on powerful uses of color in game graphics. Plenty of things to learn from both!

Going on, Polygon is running a long-form feature about the making of Final Fantasy VII (warning: really long read!) And you know, it would be a much more interesting story if it didn’t sound exactly like most other such stories. Politics, money, technology, ambition, cockiness… stop me when you grow tired of the drinking game. Is the industry ever going to learn any better?

Last but not least, fans of interactive fiction will be happy to hear that textadventures.co.uk is saved! A new team stepped up to take over, and the transition is ongoing as of this writing. Can’t wait to see what happens next.

Speaking of which, stay creative, and stay tuned. See you!

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Weekly Links #145

by on Nov.06, 2016, under News

Hello, everyone. Somehow, in-between working feverishly on the new mystery project mentioned last time (to be announced Really Soon Now), I managed to gather a good handful of links anyway, half of which are even about game design! Let’s start with Emily Short writing about small scale structures in CYOA — something that can seem obvious, but it’s worth thinking about explicitly. Then we have Jay Barnson linking to a couple of older articles about the perils of adapting tabletop RPGs to computers. A long read, but very much worth it. Then, on a more political note there’s Rock, Paper, Shotgun analyzing how we encode gender stereotypes in videogames — literally. Don’t be that game developer, mmm-kay?

(On a similar note, Carolyn VanEseltine has some notes from a conference speech on Arab representation in games post 9/11. It seems to be a recurring theme this year, and things aren’t likely to get better any time soon.)

Last but not least, in the way of digital nostalgia, The Atlantic revisits dial-up BBSes, while Rock, Paper, Shotgun (them again) takes a last, long look at Wurm Online. And while the passing of an online virtual world is natural and unavoidable, if sad, it’s good to hear that alternate means of digital communication are still alive, even in the small. Because humankind needs alternatives more than ever.

Until next time, don’t be a sheep. Thanks for reading.

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Weekly Links #143

by on Oct.23, 2016, under News

Hello, and welcome to an eventful week, if you’ll pardon the pun. The PROCJAM unconference took place just before the weekend. Released on the same occasion, the first issue of their newsletter pack a hundred full-color pages of little treasures for anyone interested in procedural generation. Stay tuned for the upcoming game jam of the same name. In the mean time, as Slashdot reminds, the 22nd edition of the IFComp still has three weeks to go. Take a look!

In the way of game design advice, Rock, Paper, Shotgun has a write-up about choice in RPGs, and the gist of it is: let the player feel like they’re making an impact on the game world, even if it’s often an illusion. Give them at least a bit of agency. And elsewhere there’s a long, thoughtful essay about what made Ultima VI great. And while the bit about mapping games by hand is iffy, I actually considered using a flood fill algorithm for visibility in my roguelikes. It just never occurred to me that it simulates environmental awareness better than line-of-sight, simply because we also use memory.

Which reminds me that monitors have their color generation adjusted to match the sensitivity curve of the human eye, the Vorbis audio codec compresses sound based on how people hear, and some features of POV-Ray drop any pretense of physical simulation in favor of sort-of reproducing things we can see in the real world…

I’ll end with Hardcore Gaming 101’s retrospective of Phantasmagoria, and — fresh off the press — my own article in TeleRead about interactive fiction as a media tie-in. Enjoy, and see you next time.

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Coming soon: Laser Sky

by on Sep.29, 2016, under Gamedev

Funny how much morale matters in game development. While this weekend I was in no condition to work on Laser Sky, the game was in a condition to be seen by a few early testers, and that gave me the energy to go on. Not that the feedback was so great: everyone’s first reaction was to call it sluggish and unresponsive. It didn’t feel that way to me, but when three people say you’re drunk…

So the first thing I did on Monday morning was to make the player’s ship accelerate just a little faster. Which, to my surprise, improved the game balance, and subsequent testers merely remarked the game is slow-paced. In other words, exactly as intended. Success! Most of them also praised the graphics, though one tester was put off by the same “paper airplane” enemies another loved. There’s no accounting for taste. And hey, both of them recognized the inspiration despite the abstract shape. Go me.

laser-sky-art

Anyway, as predicted last time, the rest of the day was spent adding sound effects. They’re from the same Creative Commons pack I used for Attack Vector, except a different selection (twice as wide, too), and with no additional sources. So the two games ended up sounding nothing the like. Couldn’t locate any suitable music, but a friend offered to help with that, and from what we discussed it seems we’re on the same wavelength. So this should be great.

(continue reading…)

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Laser Sky progress report

by on Sep.22, 2016, under Gamedev

I wasn’t planning on posting updates today, since real life problems and bad weather conspired to keep me down, but in retrospect the game has progressed noticeably anyway, even if it didn’t feel like that at first.

So, a week ago I announced my new game, a good old shoot’em up called Laser Sky simply because the name was available — as opposed to pretty much anything involving the word “neon”. (Do you know how hard it is to come up with original titles these days? RogueBot for instance is used by a whole bunch of other projects, from a variety of fields. Hopefully nobody sues.)

screenshot-20160922

Anyway, at the time Laser Sky was just beginning to feel like a game, but still lacked variety. So one of the first things to add was power-ups. The first one restores lost energy, or else gives points if you’re topped up — power-ups should never become useless! The second gives you an extra gun (then a third in the tail, which was sorely needed), and after that it erases the heat build-up, that gets significant even though with two guns you fire more slowly. The whole thing took some balancing work, because more guns should be more powerful overall, but still come at a cost. With a bit of special-casing, and otherwise fewer changes than expected, that too worked out great. It requires a change in strategy that just makes sense, and feels satisfying. Not bad for just one addition!

(continue reading…)

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Weekly Links #136

by on Sep.04, 2016, under Gamedev, News

Hello, everyone! Despite difficulties that nearly killed the event, Ludum Dare 36 took place last weekend. My friends Chip Caramel and Jimun were at it again, and came up with their best game yet. Check this out:

Around the same time, I was briefly involved in a Tumblr conversation about the point of videogames, and the consensus is what I’ve been pointing out for years now: that games express themselves through the way they interact with players, and unless a game mechanic is front and center, what you have isn’t a game. Read for details.

On a similar note, Alexis Kennedy of Fallen London and Sunless Sea fame explains why more content won’t save your game — a write-up that starts kind of abruptly, but has a lot to say by the end. And still in the game design department, here’s the first installment in a comparative history of videogames from the perspective of inventory systems. Knowing how tricky it is to make a good one, I say that’s as useful as it is unusual.

I’ll end with a little bit of history. Remember a while ago when Jason Scott recovered the source code for the original Prince of Persia? Turns out he’s been at it again, making available previously unknown alpha and beta builds of Karateka — Jordan Mechner’s other classic. Game designers can now see how the seminal beat’em up took shape, and that’s no less important than writers being able to read the early drafts of famous novels or poems from centuries past.

On that thought, I’ll leave you enjoy the Sunday. Have a great next week.

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Weekly Links #131

by on Jul.31, 2016, under Miscellaneous, News

Is it a book? Is it a piece of software? It is a game? The second edition of Make Your Own Programming Language, that I finished writing today, has a little of all three. Most importantly, it tries to recapture the fun of making the computer follow your instructions, that forgotten quality of programming that used to lure so many people decades ago. It will soon be out to beta-readers, and then I’ll let you know.

In other news, Rock, Paper, Shotgun is running a series of articles on the future of procedural generation, specifically about spinning lore for computer role-playing games. Which would be pretty interesting, except for most roguelikes that would be overkill, while in more conventional CRPGs handcrafted characters, stories and settings are the whole point. Do games that aim to have emerging narratives even need that much detail, especially if it’s ultimately fluff?

Going forward, via Jay Barnson, here’s a Gamasutra article about Chrono Trigger’s Design Secrets, that manages to be useful even though I never played the game. And Jimmy Maher’s history of computer story games has reached the demise of Infocom; check out the quote from Marc Blank, who was stating who knows how long ago what myself and others have been blogging about all spring:

If all of a sudden you can ask any question, but there are really only three questions that are important to the story, you’re either going to spend all this time coming up with answers that don’t mean anything or you’re going to have a lot of “I don’t know that,” which is frustrating. I always suspected it was a dead end. The nice thing about the command-oriented game is that you can come up with a pretty complete vocabulary and a pretty complete set of responses. As soon as it becomes more open-ended — if I can say, “I’m hungry” or “I like blue rubber balls” — how do you respond to that?

To end on a nostalgic note, here’s a blog post about abandoned arcades, and the slow death game cabinets are sentenced to when left exposed to the elements. Thankfully, there is interest in rescuing these old machines as of late, so for the most part arcades are a bit of history we can expect to survive.

Until next time, don’t let the past be forgotten.

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Weekly Links #123

by on Jun.05, 2016, under Gamedev, News

Hello, everyone. After a week lost to false starts and self-doubt, I’m ready to announce that my roguelike Tomb of the Snake will be getting a graphical port for Windows and Linux, more than a year after launch. The “graphical” part is central, because it will make the game appealing to more people, and also it will keep things fresh for me. Not that I’m looking forward to designing an inventory screen from scratch, but it beats being bored.

In other news, this week Shamus Young wrote about the mistakes Doom didn’t make (that would be the new one, not the 1993 original), and the quest designers of Witcher 3 wrote about their approach. But more interesting to me is an article Nightwrath sent about a new trend in retro game aesthetics. Remember two years ago when a blogger was complaining about the supposed ugliness of early 3D games? Turns out, people actually like that look enough to revive it on a wide scale these days, introducing a whole new generation of gamers to the pleasures of using their imagination.

Once again, it turns out style matters. Do you have a favorite game aesthetic?

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