No Time To Play

Tag: diversity

Weekly Links #185

by on Aug.30, 2017, under News

Hello, everyone, and welcome to a belated newsletter. In my defense, I’ve been unwell for the past few days. On the plus side, I actually completed my game port! Expect a release announcement next week.

Let’s start with a couple of retrospectives, one of Starwing (yes, the European edition), and one of Tekumel, a lesser know but highly detailed fantasy setting for roleplaying games.

In actual news, we learn that D&D will have more queer content, and while normally I’d be skeptical of such an initiative, the powers that be at WotC actually got it right, by hiring queer people to tell their own stories. This might just work out, if they manage to refrain from executive meddling, so stay tuned.

Moving on to actual game development, we have someone sharing their first experiences with Twine, and it’s incredibly cute how they insist that Twine allows one to make games without any programming, only to go ahead and give examples of… wait for it… code! Admittedly Sugarcube markup, not JS, but an if-else clause is an if-else clause. Are people so afraid of the idea of programming that they’re lying to themselves to such a degree? Grace Hopper’s early research into human-friendly languages seems to suggest so, and Inform 7 takes that conclusion to its logical extreme, with results that speak for themselves. An idea for future design work… to mirror the past.

Last but not least, via the Dragonfly BSD Digest, we have a sizable and well-curated list of OpenBSD gaming resources. Surprisingly, it’s about much more than emulators. Good to know!

And with that, I’ll leave you to enjoy what’s left of this Sunday. Cheers!

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Weekly Links #179

by on Jul.16, 2017, under Case study, News

Hello, everyone. Only half a dozen links today, and relatively disjoint, too. Let’s go in reverse chronological order.

For one thing, Gamasutra reposts an old postmortem of KOTOR, with some interesting lessons to take home. On a related note, if about a newer game, Hardcore Gaming 101 runs an in-depth article on Tides of Numenera, covering what works and what doesn’t in this much awaited title. Without going into details, the former’s problems are still relevant, while the latter’s are sadly unsurprising.

But often the difficulties in this business aren’t technological but human in nature, and it was refreshing to hear about Unity’s new program to help developers from the Middle East make it to conferences in Europe. Not much to say about this either, except it’s about time to make the global discourse be about the whole world again.

To go off-topic for a moment, Peregrine Wade writes about why short movies matter, It’s a very good point, and once again, gaming is ahead of the film industry (not to mention the book industry) in recognizing the value of shorter works that don’t outstay their welcome. And interactive fiction was there first.

Speaking of which, Jason Dyer discusses moments that can only work in a parser-based game, in the context of an obscure old adventure, while on the intfiction.org forums the prolific reviewer known as Mathbrush started an overview of every year in the IFComp, that’s already at 2002 as of this writing.

But I’m already at the end. See you next week.

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Weekly Links #168: diversity edition

by on May.02, 2017, under News

Sometimes outages have the worst timing. As of this writing, I’ve had no Internet for over 24 hours, and it could be another day or more until it’s fixed, due to May Day falling on a Monday. But the show must go on.

I’ll start with an article that’s not about games at all — in fact it’s about diversity in superhero comics. But the following quote applies all too well to games, and in fact any other medium:

“Diversity” as a concept is a useful tool, but it can’t be the goal or the final product. It assumes whiteness (and/or maleness and/or heteronormitivity [sic]) as the default and everything else as a deviation from that. This is why diversity initiatives so often end up being quantitative—focused on the number of “diverse” individuals—rather than qualitative, committed to positive representation and active inclusion in all levels of creation and production. This kind of in-name-only diversity thinking is why Mayonnaise McWhitefeminism got cast as Major Motoko Kusanagi while actual Japanese person Rila Fukushima was used as nothing but a face mold for robot geishas.

On a related note, the analysis of visual novels I mentioned two weeks ago continues with a look at VN protagonists, and the conclusion is inescapable: (Note: EVN is short for English-language Visual Novel, as in original as opposed to a translation from Japanese.)

Despite VNs being portrayed as escapist literature with generic self-insert protagonists, our analysis seems to suggest the reverse. Fans far prefer protagonists with strong identities, and EVNs are leading the way in exploring stories with more diverse characters. The videogame industry could learn something from our little medium.

To top it all, Jimmy Maher writing about the history of Wing Commander points out the way a cheesy action game from 1990 did better than many modern titles at diversity and inclusion, despite its reliance on ethnic stereotypes, simply because it tried in earnest.

Moving on, straight from the horse’s mouth we get a look at Blizzard’s past with the making of Starcraft, and at their future with an interview about how World of Warcraft might evolve. In unrelated news, Warren Spector talks to Gamasutra about doing your own thing as a game designer (and asking bigger questions).

And speaking of game design, as the only piece of news this week that’s actually on topic we have Emily Short with a collection of links about spatial storytelling, that as usual apply to much more than just interactive fiction.

Enjoy, and see you next time.

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