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Weekly Links #256

10 February 2019 — No Time To Play

Hello, everyone. Some weeks I get so caught up in a project or other that it leaves me little attention to spare for gaming news worth commenting on. This time it was the interpreter architecture mentioned last week. Figured I'd give it a good workout, you see, and work out it did, a lot better than expected. As of this writing I'm on the way to releasing a real-world, if not very useful, version. People are already interested in the online preview, so my hopes are high for once. And damn if it doesn't feel good to have a scripting language that can be ported to a new platform literally in hours, even as it's grown enough to not really be a toy anymore.

In the way of news, I hear the big publishers are all complaining about a terrible 2018, financially speaking. By which they mean profits are a few percent below their unreasonable expectations, so they're firing hundreds of people to keep the obscene bonuses of CEOs intact. Cue a "meanwhile, in Japan" moment: it was just last month, if memory serves, that Nintendo management cut their own wages in half so they'd have enough to keep paying their employees. Again.

That's why they continue to be so successful, folks: for all their sins, Nintendo is a humane business, and it shows in everything they do. Including games.

One other topic this week: at the very last moment, fluffy alerts me of a new game development tool called Môsi. It's inspired by Bitsy, except with a lot more features and designed for making games on a smartphone.

Or so it's supposed to; on mobile Chrome all I got was a blank screen. On desktop I can play the example, and browse through the various editor tabs, though actually editing sprites and rooms doesn't work in either Opera or Firefox. Oh well, Môsi is in early development. And there's quite a bit to look at: you can choose the size of your game world, that of a screen, a sprite, and even how many colors your game will have. Sprites can have multiple animation frames, and rich interactions are possible, including branching and looping. In other words... programming (cue finger wiggling), though it's all visual.

Not much more to say about it at this point, but this right here is a thing to watch closely. Could easily take off in a big way. And did I mention it's open source?

Thanks for reading, and enjoy the Sunday!

Tags: tools, programming, business

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Weekly Links #255

03 February 2019 — No Time To Play

Hello, everyone! It's been another week when I didn't work on games. Instead, my attention has been consumed by yet another scripting language. Or rather, a framework for making any number of them very easily, in tiny amounts of code. This is more important than it seems. For one thing, it will finally allow me to put one in Adventure Prompt, a goal that drove much of my research in recent years. And then, the radical simplicity of the system opens up opportunities I couldn't even consider before. Enter the guerilla scripting engine, that you can add to mostly any software on a whim. It's that easy.

Details soon. In the mean time, lets see what's new in the gaming world.

Not reporting, in any event. Dear game journalists, do you realize that various platforms get exclusive titles all the time? That's not a "war", it's business as usual. And the only result is that the rights holders soon discover how much money they're leaving on the table, so they back out of the exclusivity arrangement. Hopefully.

People do it all the time with Steam and nobody bats an eyelid. But enter Epic's new store, and people seem unable to think clearly all of a sudden. For some reason.

(Also, duuudes. Can you please stop with the 60FPS snobbery already? It's getting tiresome AF. And damaging.)

On a more cheerful note, Ren'Py just turned 15, and its amazing journey gives no signs of slowing down quite yet. Which fills me with joy. Maybe one of these days I'll manage to pick it up again, too.

Last but not least, this weekend Hardcore Gaming 101 covers Dune (Cryo's 1991 game), in their usual detailed manner. I'm yet to finish reading as of this writing, but it brings back all kinds of memories. Funny how the Dune game that didn't span a major, enduring genre remains the one that's fondly remembered, and amply discussed when it comes up.

With that, I'll let you enjoy the Sunday. Bye!

Tags: programming, business, adventure

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